We’ve all suffered through presentations stuffed with information. You know the kind: complicated graphics; walls of text; speakers droning on for hours. Why can’t they just make it concise and cut to the chase?

To keep your presentations concise, put these four tips to the test:

1 – Use Images Instead of Words

Why say “long yellow fruit” when you could say banana? Why say banana when you could show this:

 

Concise, 4 Tips to Make Your Presentation More Concise

The fact is, we can process images in as little as 13 milliseconds. Between your audience’s eyesight and English comprehension, it can take them much longer to process text. Because of this, it’s a no-brainer to incorporate more images.

Better yet, using images can even help expand the audience of your presentation. Of course, you can’t explain everything with images alone. While your slides should be word-free, your script won’t be.

 

2 – Use Shorter Sentences

“As corroborated by the general enthusiasm surrounding their consumption, it may be inferred that Musa acuminata have an agreeable taste.” In other words, bananas are tasty. Always aim for short, simple sentences in your script. A great tip is to pretend you’re writing to fourteen year olds. That isn’t to say you should sound immature, just that you should sound easily understandable.

Of course, it all depends on your audience. If you’re presenting to experts on your subject, you can get away with using advanced terms they’ll understand. Just to be sure to keep everything around them clear! On the note of keeping things clear…

 

3 – Use Blank Space

 

It’s said that you should stick to one idea per slide. So what do you stick around that idea? Nothing! No swamping your slide with supporting numbers. No paragraphs to prove your point. Just beautiful blank space to bring attention to your idea.

Blank doesn’t have to look boring either. Just look at the slides in our post on presentation inspiration. Each of them fill the space around their ideas with simple images and designs that don’t detract from the main idea. Instead, they make it stand out.

Of course, these suggestions have all been for static slides so far. We haven’t touched upon the most important way to make presentations more concise

4 – Motion Design

 

We’ve written before about how animation can improve any presentation. Really, any sort of video can concisely explain your concepts to an audience. Scientifically speaking, this makes sense. You see, since the stone age, the middle temporal regions of our visual cortexes have lit up whenever we see moving objects. Back in the day, this cortex kept us alive by helping us track prey. Now it’s just the reason everyone’s addicted to Netflix.

By incorporating videos into your presentation, you can quickly convey a lot of information to an attentive audience. This keeps you from having to explain each point again and again. That keeps your presentation concise and your audience content.

 

In conclusion, concise presentations…

 

Are easy to produce with these four tips from our top designers. Of course, these aren’t the only ways to make more effective presentations. Speak to our professional presentation designers today to see how we can win your next presentation.

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